Where to Eat in Rome

Welcome to the third post in my series about our trip to Rome. I’ve already talked about how to save when traveling to Rome, what to do while there, and now I’m going to share one of my favorite parts, where to eat! Although it is often imitated, Italian food straight from the source is like no other. The pasta melts in your mouth like only homemade pasta (I assume) can do. The restaurants use seasonal ingredients in all of their recipes, making everything taste fresh and unique to that moment in time. Everything we had seemed simply prepared yet offered a feast for the senses. Each ingredient is designed to stand out, whether it is a subtle squeeze of lemon juice and salt or a spicy bite of arugula to complement something sweet.

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We were so jetlagged when we arrived that we tried the first restaurant we spotted near our Airbnb, Ristorante Target. I wish I had taken photos because it was one of the best meals of the whole trip.  I had the maltagliati pasta with tomatoes, shrimp, and arugula. When we finally had a night’s worth of sleep, we were up early most days and needed coffee. To optimize our time and save money, we didn’t focus too much on breakfast. We started most days with “due espresso” and a croissant at the café and bar near our Airbnb. There is a place to get coffee and pastries around every corner, so don’t worry about options.

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We enjoyed a nice lunch one day at Cucina Del Teatro, not far from Piazzo Navona. It’s tucked down a cute little flower- and table-lined alleyway. I still dream about the pumpkin soup. And the pizza with fresh seasonal ingredients is one I’ll never forget.

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For a fancier dinner one night, we tried Da Fortunata. It offers a great view of the Pantheon if you get the chance to sit outside, and has some of the best spaghetti and clams I’ve ever had. I highly recommend starting with the burrata and tomato salad.

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We spent one afternoon in Trastevere where we tried a truly authentic restaurant Tratorria da Lucia. Everything was simply prepared but delicious, especially the cacio e pepe. The restaurant was packed on a Sunday afternoon with what seemed like students and families, a telling sign about its popularity among locals.

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Like I said in one of my earlier posts, we spent a lot of time near and around Pizza Navona. I can’t vouch for the restaurants right on the square, but Rick Steeves recommends many that are off the beaten path but close by. Bar Del Fico is one such place and featured one of my favorite newly discovered delicacies: octopus carpaccio. It’s pressed and thinly sliced octopus served with olive oil, lemon juice, and fennel. Show stopper! I had the linguine and lobster for my main course. Need I say more?

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The very last night, we tried my favorite restaurant of the entire trip. Another one near Piazza Navona: Enoteca Cul de Sac. It’s a tiny restaurant with barely enough space for all of the wine let alone people, but this also felt like a place where the locals might frequent. We started with the escargot. It was served in a mind-blowing parsley butter sauce. I had the lasagna for my main. Each noodle was evenly cooked and every bite was a perfect melt-in-your-mouth mix of sauce, noodle, meat, and cheese. It felt good to end the trip on such a high note!

Rome is an affordable city to visit, so food is definitely one the aspects you can really enjoy. I found the prices at most restaurants comparable to going out to eat in a city like Pittsburgh. There were options at every price point. When in doubt, have the wine. It’s all good!

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