Independent Business: The Ohio Knitting Mills Pop-Up Shop

When one thinks of Cleveland, they don’t usually associate the city with the production of clothing. However, at one time, the manufacture of ready-to-wear clothing was one of Cleveland’s leading industries, and during its peak in the 1920s, it ranked with New York City.
The remnants of this bygone industry can be perused and purchased for a brief period of time at the Ohio Knitting Mills Pop-Up Shop on Detroit Road in the Gordon Park Arts District ½ a block from the Cleveland Public Theater.
In the store, you will find an archived collection of mainstream fashions from as far back as World War II.
The story of the Ohio Knitting Mills started in 1927 when Harry Stone began the family business. It eventually became one of the country’s largest knitwear producers, making knitwear for department stores from Sears to Saks, and hundreds of revered labels like Pendleton, Van Heusen, and Jack Winter. Today the story continues as Steven Tatar acquired the rights to sell the perfectly preserved 5,000-plus sample archive.
I was able to visit the store over the weekend and loved being able to touch the textures of the handmade clothing and see in person the unique, bright colors and patterns. If you love vintage American fashion, then you must visit the shop. The prices for clothing vary, ranging roughly between $28-$128. I will be sharing my purchase with you tomorrow in an outfit post, but until then, enjoy these photos and read more about the store at the site and about the Cleveland garment industry here.

Recycled clothing


I found a blog over the weekend that is truly an inspiration for me. So far you know that I have a mild, non-serious shopping addiction. I just love to try out new things and that has lead to me spending more than I want to on clothes, which has lead to my New Year’s Resolution: no spending on clothes for the next three months. But when I am done with my spending freeze, I am definitely going to use Marisa’s blog as my guide. She has decided to buy only clothes from garage sales and flea markets. Her budget: $1 a day. She takes ridiculous looking clothes and takes them in with her sewing machine or dyes them to make them look more current. Just look what she did to this oversized dress with its awesome pattern. Amazing!

Places to shop: Tremont

I just found a new vintagey clothing shop, right in the Cleveland area, Tremont, to be exact. Tremont is a charming area that has been reinvented with galleries, shops, and some of the best restaurants and bars in Cleveland. It also is home to some very unique and creative merchants such as Lilly Handmade Chocolates, who carries specialty beers and wines in addition to her handmade chocolates. The store owner is in love with the color pink, and if you ever go to her shop you will find several pink piggy banks, not to mention bright pink walls. You never forget a place that sells chocolate and beer, and is completely decorated in pink—great marketing strategy.
Tremont also is starting to become home to some interesting clothing boutiques, including Pinky’s Daily Planner, a handmade clothing collection designed by Stephanie Fralick. It is described on the site as being modern, but if anything the clothing has a vintage flair. It is where I imagine Zooey Deschanel would shop if she lived in Cleveland, and it has a similar style as Anthropologie—and similar pricing. The store has very limited hours: Friday 2 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 2 to 9 p.m., but you can also visit the store by appointment. And if you can’t make it to the store you can make purchases on the Web site. Here is an idea of what they have: